"I dont mind living in a man's world as long as I can be a woman in it." ~Marilyn Monroe

"I don't mind living in a man's body as long as I can be a woman in it." ~VinVin Jacla

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Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Teen actress-singer takes the lead in “JEM AND THE HOLOGRAMS”


TEEN ACTRESS-SINGER TAKES THE LEAD IN “JEM AND THE HOLOGRAMS”

Most widely known for her role as the love-to-hate Layla Grant on ABC’s beloved series, “Nashville,” teen actress Aubrey Peeples takes on the lead role of Jerrica and her alter ego Jem, in Universal Pictures' musical-adventure “Jem and the Holograms.”

In the film, as a small-town girl (Peeples) catapults from underground video sensation to global superstar, she and her band of sisters begin a one-in-a-million journey of discovering that some talents are too special to keep hidden. Four aspiring musicians will take the world by storm when they see that the key to creating your destiny lies in finding your own voice.

When recruiting and casting the actress who would portray both Jerrica and Jem, director Jon M. Chu and his fellow producers had quite a task at hand. They needed to find someone who could embody both small-town girl Jerrica, who has been living the unexceptional life up until the time she dons a secret identity inspired by her music, as well as Jem, the bold, stunning and absolutely fearless superstar who is everything that her alter-ego eschews. To add to that, they required a seasoned vocalist who could step right into the complexities of the music and lyrics—a tall order indeed for the production.

In fact, the filmmakers needed to present a Jerrica who is the exact opposite person that one would expect to be Jem. Unlike her sisters, who love to share the minutiae of their lives by posting around the clock on their social media accounts, Jerrica is extremely shy. Although she is a wallflower who cherishes her privacy, in her heart, she is a dreamer and a creator. And while she writes music alone in her room, she will soon find out that some talents are too special to keep hidden. Jem, established by the pet name that her father had for her before he died, is about to meet the world.

Chu walks us through our protagonist’s struggle: “Jerrica has a gift, and it’s up to her sisters to draw that out of her. Once she’s empowered, once the world literally hands itself to her and says, ‘We follow you,’ she has to decide what kind of a person she’s going to be. Is she going to be a hero, or is she going to be a villain? That’s a huge struggle for a teenage girl to go through as she attempts to fit in with her high school friends—or with her sisters.”

The performer who stood out among all others was Aubrey Peeples, who has starred as Layla Grant on ABC’s Nashville since 2013. The versatile singer, dancer and actress knew she was headed for an enormous task when she signed on to portray both Jerrica and Jem, but she was up for the challenge. Peeples appreciated that Jerrica wasn’t starstruck; rather, she cares predominantly about her music and family. Peeples offers some insight: “Jerrica has had to take care of her younger sister because they grew up without a mom. Now that their dad is gone, she has to take control of everything. She is alone in this position, but she rises to the challenge.”

While too young to have embraced the original animated series Jem and the Holograms as a young girl, that didn’t stop Peeples from being moved by the series’—and now the film’s—timeless tropes of commitment to family and embracing one’s signature creativity. She shares: “I love the messages of aspiring to reach your goal and honoring all cultures. I was also thrilled that the story looks at the double-edged sword of social media. I don’t think that we’ve had a film that comments on both the all-consuming nature of it…as well as how it can form a connection among people all around the world.”

Chu provides a bit of insight into Peeples’ casting: “When we met Aubrey, we knew right away that she was the one. She wasn’t just a great singer, she had an old soul that’s rare to find in young actors today. She loves analog over digital, and she could care less about fame. Instead, she was all about honesty in her craft. She was powerfully subtle in Jerrica’s quiet moments, then explosive and commanding in Jem’s performances on stage. It was pretty extraordinary to watch. She was everything we needed in our new Jem.”

“Jem and the Holograms” also stars Stefanie Scott (“Insidious: Chapter 3”) as Kimber Benton, Aurora Perrineau (“A House Is Not a Home”) as Shana Elmsford, Hayley Koyoko (TV’s “CSI: Cyber”) as Aja Leith, Ryan Guzman (“The Boy Next Door”) as Rio, Molly Ringwald as Aunt Bailey and Oscar®-nominated actress Juliette Lewis as Erica Raymond.




Opening exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas nationwide on Nov. 4, “Jem and the Holograms” is distributed by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


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Young women express themselves, conquer hearts in “JEM AND THE HOLOGRAMS”


YOUNG WOMEN EXPRESS THEMSELVES, CONQUER HEARTS IN “JEM AND THE HOLOGRAMS”

As a small-town girl catapults from underground video sensation to global superstar, she and her band of sisters begin a one-in-a-million journey of discovering that some talents are too special to keep hidden. In Universal Pictures’ “Jem and the Holograms,” four aspiring musicians will take the world by storm when they see that the key to creating your destiny lies in finding your own voice.

Watch the Youngblood music video for “Jem and the Holograms” below.




Directed by Jon M. Chu (“Step Up” series, “G.I. Joe: Retaliation”), the musical adventure stars Aubrey Peeples (TV’s “Nashville”) as Jerrica Benton/Jem, Stefanie Scott (“Insidious: Chapter 3”) as Kimber Benton, Aurora Perrineau (“A House Is Not a Home”) as Shana Elmsford, Hayley Koyoko (TV’s “CSI: Cyber”) as Aja Leith, Ryan Guzman (“The Boy Next Door”) as Rio, Molly Ringwald (TV’s “The Secret Life of the American Teenager”) as Aunt Bailey and Oscar®-nominated actress Juliette Lewis (TV’s “Secrets and Lies”) as Erica Raymond.

“Jem and the Holograms,” based on the iconic ’80s Hasbro animated television series, is written by Ryan Landels (TV’s “Masterclass”).

The idea of reinventing Jerrica and her sisters for the big screen has been a longtime passion project of director Jon M. Chu, who has had a deep attachment to Jem and the Holograms since he was a child.

Chu found that the stars had finally aligned when the producers began discussing what it would look like—and what it would take—to reimagine this beloved property as a live-action film. Their 2015 “Jem and the Holograms” would honor the same underlying messages as the ’80s series, one of female empowerment, honesty and integrity—along with fashion and great music—but it would also be embraced by a new generation. To accomplish the above—while still deeply respecting the diehard fans who have turned the quartet in this iconic property into pop-culture icons—was Chu’s uncompromising mission.

Like many who grew up in the ’80s, the director’s fascination with “Jem and the Holograms” began the moment he first watched the show. Chu appreciated the positive messages that the program brought to kids of his generation, as well as the originality of the stories and characters. “It just really went crazy,” says Chu. “They didn’t go by any rules or any sort of way that cartoons are supposed to be made. The audiovisual robot Synergy would transform Jem and the Holograms into exciting avatars, and they would perform, fight the Misfits and go on adventures. They went everywhere and anywhere. That kind of fearlessness was something other cartoons just didn’t offer, and so I always went back to it as a kid. That inspired and shaped me as an artist as I grew up.”

Chu explains just what was so riveting about the series: “Jem was unlike anything on TV. At the time, I didn’t know what I loved about it other than it was fun and there was music; it was a superhero story where I could use my imagination and play alongside my toys. It wasn’t until years later that I realized how much joy the show brought me and that it was a fearless cartoon about female empowerment. The essence of the show was being true to your identity and nurturing your free expression—whether that is through music, art, dance or something else. Jem and the Holograms were true defenders of that idea.”




“Jem and the Holograms” opens across the Philippines on Nov. 04, 2015 and is distributed by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


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“AMERICAN ULTRA” mashes up comedy with violence, romance


“AMERICAN ULTRA” MASHES UP COMEDY WITH VIOLENCE, ROMANCE

L.A. Weekly describes it as “A bloody valentine attached to a bomb. It's violent, brash, inventive and horrific, and perhaps the most romantic film of the year.”

Boston Globe calls its stars Jesse Eisenberg and Kristen Stewart, “Tender, forgiving, and sexy, they're the hottest couple on screen at the moment.”

They're talking about Buena Vista International's new dark comedy “American Ultra,” the trippy story of Mike (Eisenberg), a convenience store clerk and his girlfriend, Phoebe (Stewart) whose sleepy, small-town existence is disrupted when his past comes back to haunt him in the form of a government operation set to wipe him out.

"The script is funny and scary and violent and sweet," producer Anthony Bregman says. "It makes you swing in so many directions emotionally, which makes for a great movie experience. [Screenwriter] Max Landis knows the action genre well, which allows him to make fun of it while living up to the conventions and expectations."

A large part of the humor comes from the fact that the filmmakers never lose sight of the idea that reclaiming his hardcore combat skills doesn't change who Mike is. "Mike is a bit of a dreamer and he never loses that quality," says producer David Alpert. "It's just that now people are trying to kill him. We always tried to maintain a connection to what it would really be like if the stoner guy in your town got these abilities."

Director Nima Nourizadeh, whose first film “Project X” has established him as an innovative new talent in Hollywood, impressed the producers with his ideas for maximizing both the action and the humor in the script. "Nima is a startling visionary in terms of how he sees a scene," says Landis. "He didn't change the script much, but the things he added made it even better. He structured the rhythms and beats in a way that is genuinely funny and fun to watch."

Nourizadeh brought a sharp sense of humor, as well as an authentic sense of danger and visual excitement to the script, according to Bregman. "He is better than anyone I can think of at establishing a really calm, stable atmosphere on screen that eventually explodes into a state of complete choreographed chaos. It's really fun to watch that build and ignite."

The writer and director first met in April 2013 to exchange ideas about future projects. Landis told Nourizadeh about “American Ultra,” a spec script no one outside of his team had read yet. "The script really exceeded my expectations," says the director. "Max is an intriguing storyteller. He feeds you information a little bit at a time until you are suddenly somewhere unexpected and completely crazy. His writing is always entertaining, but what separates this from other action comedies I'd read was that he nailed down the relationships between the main characters. It was the perfect second project for me."

Producers Bregman and Alpert agreed. "The combination of Max and Nima was irresistible," Bregman says. "Max's first feature script, `Chronicle,' is a favorite of mine. It was made on a modest budget with really interesting visuals that made it seem much bigger than it was. Nima's `Project X' was, in my opinion, one of the best movies of the last few years. It's another small film with a really big reach. Both were fun and entertaining and innovative, and at the same time dealt with big issues in a subtle way. It's exactly the sort of movie I want to see."

"Teaming Max and Nima up and then adding Jesse Eisenberg and Kristen Stewart to the mix feels like we're looking at the next generation of great Hollywood filmmakers," concludes Alpert.




“American Ultra” will be shown exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas nationwide starting Oct. 28.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


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Who is that "gay" I see staring straight back at me...?

Why is my reflection someone I don't know?

Must I pretend that I'm someone else for all time?

When will my reflection show...who I am inside?