"I dont mind living in a man's world as long as I can be a woman in it." ~Marilyn Monroe

"I don't mind living in a man's body as long as I can be a woman in it." ~VinVin Jacla

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Thursday, February 4, 2016

“DEADPOOL” to paint the town red on Feb. 10 (in cinemas)


“DEADPOOL” TO PAINT THE TOWN RED ON FEB.10 (IN CINEMAS)

Expect plenty of wry humour in “Deadpool,” directed by Tim Miller and at Reynolds’ own experiences in the comic book world. Based upon Marvel Comics’ most unconventional anti-hero, “Deadpool” tells the origin story of former Special Forces operative turned mercenary Wade Wilson, who after being subjected to a rogue experiment that leaves him with accelerated healing powers adopts the alter ego Deadpool. Armed with his new abilities and a dark, twisted sense of humor, Deadpool hunts down the man who nearly destroyed his life.

“Deadpool” star and producer Ryan Reynolds has no bigger fan than Marvel Comics legend Stan Lee, who has a fun cameo in the film and also serves as an executive producer. “There’s never been a character like Deadpool, and Ryan Reynolds plays him as though he was born to play the role,” says Lee. “Just like Robert Downey, Jr. was born to be Iron Man, you just can’t picture anybody else besides Ryan as Deadpool.”

Reynolds embraced the character’s myriad (and often twisted) facets. “In the comic book world, Deadpool is a man of our time with the ability to spout just the right thing, in terms of a pop culture reference, at the worst possible moment,” he quips. “That’s what makes him interesting to me and also makes him sort of limitless.”

Reynolds had long championed a film version of the iconic comics character. His deep involvement in the film’s development continued throughout production, in brainstorming sessions with director Tim Miller and screenwriters Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick (“Zombieland”).

Tim Miller, who makes his feature film directorial debut on Deadpool, notes, “I think Ryan’s personality and DNA are really infused in the character. It was a close match to begin with, which is why Ryan was so attracted to Deadpool in the first place.”

“Ryan has a tremendous sense of humor, is very quick, and the character has really seeped into him,” says Reese. “He became in a way our ‘Deadpool Police.’ Whenever we got off tone or were writing in a way that didn't feel quite right, Ryan would say, ‘I don't think that sounds like Deadpool.’ We knew he was the best arbiter, because Ryan knows and loves the comics and has assimilated Deadpool’s voice and sense of humor.”
“We’re staying as true to the character as possible,” adds Reynolds. “We really ran with the idea of Deadpool being aware he’s a comic book anti-hero. It gave us the freedom to tell this story in a totally unorthodox way. We occupy a space that no other comic book movie has – or can.”

Deadpool is a unique figure in the Marvel Universe. Fabian Nicieza and Rob Liefeld created Deadpool as possessing an often non-superheroic attitude. A sardonic foil to the holier-than-thou heroes and villains that populate Marvel’s other comics, Deadpool constantly cracks edgy jokes and breaks the fourth wall.

Liefeld joins Stan Lee in his admiration of the filmmakers’ work in translating the character to the big screen. “DEADPOOL explodes with action,” says Liefeld. “Ryan, Tim Miller, Paul and Rhett mined all the good stuff in the comics from about a ten-year period and came up with a movie that sews it all together. This will be the Deadpool that will become canon moving forward!”




It’s a date on Valentine’s week with “Deadpool” starting February 10 in cinemas (and IMAX screens) nationwide from 20th Century Fox to be distributed by Warner Bros.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


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New “SPIDER-MAN” to be released worldwide in IMAX 3D cinemas


NEW “SPIDER-MAN” TO BE RELEASED WORLDWIDE IN IMAX 3D CINEMAS

Spider-Man, one of the world’s most beloved superheroes, will once again come to IMAX® Theatres for a network-wide event run when the film is released in theaters on its new worldwide date on July 7, 2017, it was announced on January 26 2016 by Josh Greenstein, president of Worldwide Marketing and Distribution for Sony Pictures, Kevin Feige, president of Marvel Studios, and Greg Foster, Senior Executive Vice President, IMAX Corp. and CEO of IMAX Entertainment.

As the movie, which Sony Pictures Entertainment is teaming with Marvel Studios to produce, enters wide release, it will also be digitally re-mastered into the immersive IMAX® 3D format. The highly anticipated next installment in the $4 billion franchise, which will star Tom Holland as Peter Parker/Spider-Man, will be directed by Jon Watts and produced by Feige and Amy Pascal.

Commenting on the announcement, Greenstein said, “There’s so much about Spider-Man – including the web-slinging action – that lends itself perfectly to the IMAX screen. We are confident that audiences everywhere around the world will want to see it in IMAX.”

Feige said: “Time and time again IMAX delivers super-hero sized movie going experiences to fans. With the anticipation for Spider-Man climbing, we are excited that IMAX has committed early to this extended release plan -- it will be a great way for audiences around the world to experience such a big event film.”

Foster said, “IMAX’s long-standing relationship with Marvel and Sony first began with Spider-Man in 2002, establishing the ultimate way for fans to be transported into the world of their favorite characters like Peter Parker. By re-teaming with our friends at Sony and Marvel on the newest Spider-Man reboot, we are excited to deliver audiences what they’re asking for: a must-see cinematic adventure – in IMAX.”

The IMAX® 3D release of the Spider-Man film will be digitally re-mastered into the image and sound quality of The IMAX Experience® with proprietary IMAX DMR® (Digital Re-mastering) technology. The crystal-clear images, coupled with IMAX’s customized theatre geometry and powerful digital audio, create a unique environment that will make audiences feel as if they are in the movie.


 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


"Like" The Gay Life of VinVin on Facebook | Follow @GayLifeofVinVin on Twitter | Follow my blog with Bloglovin




Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Vikander shines with Oscar-worthy performance for “THE DANISH GIRL”


VIKANDER SHINES WITH OSCAR-WORTHY PERFORMANCE FOR “THE DANISH GIRL”

One of the most promising actors of her generation, Alicia Vikander has been a talent to watch in cinema in 2015, gaining international recognition, one film after another. After receiving acting prizes from several critics groups for her breakout role in “Ex Machina,” Vikander starts 2016 in style – copping her first Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress for her poignant performance in Universal Pictures' controversial drama, “The Danish Girl.”

The film is the remarkable love story inspired by the lives of Lili Elbe and Gerda Wegener, portrayed respectively by Academy Award winner Eddie Redmayne (“The Theory of Everything”) and Alicia Vikander, directed by Academy Award winner Tom Hooper (“The King’s Speech,” “Les Misérables”).

In 1926 in Copenhagen, artist Einar Wegener is married to Gerda Wegener and is revered for landscape paintings. Gerda is also an artist, less renowned but steadily working as a portraitist of prominent citizens. Theirs is a strong and loving marriage, yet personal and professional epiphanies have eluded them both.

That all begins to change one day when, on deadline for a portrait, Gerda asks her husband to fill in for a model by putting on a dress so that she can finish the painting. The experience is transformative, as Einar soon realizes that being Lili is an expression of her truest self, and she begins living her life as a woman. Gerda unexpectedly finds that she has a new muse, and renewed creative ferment. But the couple soon brush up against society’s disapproval.

Vikander walked the fine line between the real Gerda and the version of Gerda in the novel on which the movie is based. “Both myself and Eddie — and everyone involved — really took on a good job trying to adapt the book,” assures the actress. “But then to be able to go back and actually dig in, to try to find as much information about these two people, that was the real treasure for us. I love the art and all the photographs that we found. It was a direct axis to see those very ahead-of-their-time women that both Lili and Gerda were.

“We tried to read as much as we could,” adds Vikander, “but because it's a hundred years back, you realize that there's quite a lot of ambiguity in some of the information. We don't have any record of people who knew them, but you can meet people who've gone through a similar thing in life.”

Vikander continues, “We got an enormous help from wonderfully generous people from the transgender community. Maybe more from me playing Gerda, I was introduced to people who wanted to open up with their personal stories and experiences from friends or loved ones or family members or someone who has gone through this. That was very much an eye-opener for me. Even though all those stories are all very different journeys and experiences, I felt like they all wanted to share with me that feeling of — like Gerda — wanting to be support for the person that you love more than anything. They were happy to see that Gerda was involved in this film and this story because sometimes it's tough — people forgot that they were in a transition as much as their loved one.

As much as “The Danish Girl” is a serious movie, there is such a fun rapport between Vikander and Redmayne. “Eddie is down-to-earth, funny, and always honest,” narrates the actress. “Even though we work long hours and it is a very tough subject and it's a lot of very emotional big scenes, he always brings such energy to set and such humor. He just always pushed me to do my very, very best. I always felt like I had to step up and give him that. But he's extremely generous, and we had a lot of fun.”

“The Danish Girl” is vying for four Academy Awards, namely Best Actor (Redmayne), Best Supporting Actress, Best Production Design and Best Costume Design.

At the recently-concluded Golden Globe Awards, the film was nominated for Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Original Score.





To be shown exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas (Glorietta 4, TriNoma, Market Market and Fairview Terraces) starting Feb. 03, “The Danish Girl” is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


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Cast and crew on surviving real dangers in shooting “THE REVENANT”


CAST AND CREW ON SURVIVING REAL DANGERS IN SHOOTING “THE REVENANT”

The history of the American fur trade is brief, yet pivotal, full of tales of daring but also grave destruction. Though the fur trade forged the romantic image of the mountain man – idealized loners purportedly as rugged as the wilderness they felt beholden to tame -- the fur trade was also very much a business. In a sense it ushered in the first emergence of the archetypal Western entrepreneur, the visionary iconoclast who forges ahead answerable to no one but himself.

This is the era of “The Revenant,” where trappers go into pristine landscapes among indigenous populations to extract resources – and the question that comes up is: at what cost? Based on few written and memorabilia of Hugh Glass who is considered “The Revenant,” one who came back from the dead and played by Leonardo DiCaprio (this year’s SAG winner as Best Actor, Drama for Revenant role) in the titular role, is centric to the movie’s powerful theme. By the 1820s, the fur trade had reached the Rocky Mountains and become intensely competitive, with traders battling one another as well as Native tribes. Hugh Glass worked for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, then newly on the scene. The company utilized the “rendezvous system,” which meant they built no cabins or forts. Instead, their trappers were expected to hunt their own food, build their own shelter and fight their own battles, enhancing their stoic reputations.

Shooting outdoors in Canada and Argentina, in snow, wind and often at high altitude, the cast and crew of “The Revenant” faced remnants of the same dangers and conditions that people would have faced back then. Dangers in production ranged from avalanches to bears - the production even had a Bear Safety Coordinator on set every day. While cast and crew had a justified concern about local bears, no actual bear was used in the grizzly attack sequences. That was one of the few places Iñárritu utilized CGI.

Another major threat, as it is for Hugh Glass in the story, was weather. At one point, a blizzard brought minus-27 degree temperatures, and the need for crewmembers to keep an eye on each other for the signs of frostbite. “I have learned that there is no bad weather, there are only bad clothes,” Iñárritu jokes, but he notes the intense cold gave the film a shivery reality shooting in tepid conditions could not.

Typical of the film’s extremes, a record-busting hot spell (the warmest Canadian winter in 23 years) turned the filmmakers into snow diviners. “Alberta is very susceptible to radical climate changes,” says Iñárritu. “You can have seven different kinds of weather in a single day. In the beginning, we struggled with low temperatures and blizzards. Later on, we struggled with no snow. It was a winter of record high temperatures, and we went from chasing Chinooks to chasing ice.”

When the film ultimately came full circle, Iñárritu assembled cast and crew just as he had in the beginning. He said to the group, “To make a film like this is the journey of a lifetime. It’s been a journey of wonder with challenging moments and tough ones and beautiful ones. I feel honored, thankful, humble, happy and sad that we achieved what we achieved. What we achieved is amazing. Every single day of the production was difficult, but I think this has been the most fulfilling artistic experience of my lifetime.”



“The Revenant” is now showing (opens February 3) in cinemas nationwide from 20th Century Fox distributed by Warner Bros. Also available in IMAX screens.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


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Meet and Greet with ALDEN RICHARDS at Shinsen Sushi Bar and Restaurant!


Photos and info from Facebook


Exciting news to all Shinsenatics!

Meet and Greet with ALDEN RICHARDS!

For the first 100 with a minimum single receipt purchase of PhP 3,000 starting today until Friday lunch, you can get one VIP pass for Friday's meet and greet.

February 5, 2016 (Friday), 6PM
Unit 202 Hampton Gardens Arcade 100 C. Raymundo Brgy. Maybunga, Pasig City


For inquiries and reservations, call: 664-6331 / 0977-8551105.

Shinsen Sushi Bar and Restaurant serves highly pleasing and healthy food using only the freshest and finest ingredients.

"Like" Shinsen Sushi Bar and Restaurant on Facebook for more information.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


"Like" The Gay Life of VinVin on Facebook | Follow @GayLifeofVinVin on Twitter | Follow my blog with Bloglovin




Experience the immersive power of “THE REVENANT” on the big screen - available in IMAX theaters for only one week!


EXPERIENCE THE IMMERSIVE POWER OF “THE REVENANT” ON THE BIG SCREEN - AVAILABLE IN IMAX THEATERS ONLY FOR ONE WEEK!

Leonardo DiCaprio has portrayed a kaleidoscopic array of characters – from Howard Hughes to Jay Gatsby to Wolf of Wall Street’s profligate Jordan Belfort – but the role of the Hugh Glass in “The Revenant” was an entirely new challenge, taking the actor into borderlands that few in our modern world have experienced. It is DiCaprio’s most intensely physical role and at the same time, an almost wordlessly raw performance.

Academy Award®-winning director Alejandro G. Iñárritu brings the legend of Hugh Glass to the screen with “The Revenant,” an epic adventure set in the unchartered 19th century American Frontier. Immersing audiences in the unparalleled beauty, mystery and dangers of life in 1823 America, the film explores one man’s transformation in a quest for survival. Part thriller, part wilderness journey, The Revenant explores primal drives not only for life itself but for dignity, justice, faith, family and home.

DiCaprio was also enthralled by Iñárritu’s aim to bring Glass’s story to life with a realism that would plunge audiences into life in primordial Western lands long before cowboys and outlaws. “I’ve never really seen this time period in American history put on film, so that interested me,” he says. “This was a unique time and place in the history of the American West because it was far more wild than what we think of as ‘the wild, wild West.’ It was like the Amazon, a completely unknown wilderness, a no man’s land where few laws applied. These trappers who came from Europe and the East Coast had to learn to live a life in the middle of the elements -- surviving like any other animal in the wilderness.”

The director emphasizes that DiCaprio faced tests no actor could fully prepare for in his performance. “Leo was working in the toughest of conditions, under a challenging wardrobe, in extreme make-up, going to the most emotionally uncomfortable and dark places. But no matter what he is going through, something immediate comes to life when Leo is in front of the camera. There’s an incredible power,” Iñárritu observes.

The bear attack that threatens to end Glass’s life immediately took DiCaprio into a mano-a-mano struggle with one of nature’s most skilled predators. “The bear attack was incredibly difficult and arduous,” DiCaprio recalls, “but it’s profoundly moving. In the film, Alejandro puts you there almost like a fly buzzing around this attack, so that you feel the breath of Glass and the breath of the bear. What he achieved is beyond anything I’ve seen. Glass has to find a way to deal with this full-grown animal on top of him. He’s at the brink of death – and you are fully immersed in this moment with him.”

DiCaprio did many of his own stunts: he was buried in snow, went naked in minus five-degree weather and jumped into a frigid river, each moment bringing him more in touch with Glass’s will. But as he makes his way, Glass does not just abide – he also changes profoundly, something DiCaprio reveals in a multi-hued range of subtle details that add up to the film’s stirring climax.

“Throughout, there’s that question of whether some kind of revenge is ultimately the thing that will quench Glass’s thirst at the end of the day. But the need to continue on becomes something more to him…it becomes a kind of spiritual endeavor,” he concludes.





An immersive experience to be fully experienced only in theatres, get ready when “The Revenant” opens in cinemas on February 3 from 20th Century Fox to be distributed by Warner Bros.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


"Like" The Gay Life of VinVin on Facebook | Follow @GayLifeofVinVin on Twitter | Follow my blog with Bloglovin




Tuesday, February 2, 2016

"King's Speech" director back with Oscar contender “THE DANISH GIRL”


“KING'S SPEECH” DIRECTOR BACK WITH OSCAR CONTENDER “THE DANISH GIRL”

Winner of Best Director Oscar for “The King’s Speech” and nominated for the same honor for “Les Miserables,” filmmaker Tom Hooper now brings to the screen Universal Pictures’ critically lauded drama “The Danish Girl.”

Starring Eddie Redmayne and Alicia Vikander who both earned Oscar nominations for their performances, the film will be shown exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas (Glorietta 4, TriNoma, Market Market and Fairview Terraces) starting Feb. 03.

“To me, `The Danish Girl’ shares with `The King's Speech’ that theme of the blocks that lie between us and the best version of ourselves - and how we overcome those blocks,” says Hooper. “I fell in love with the script as soon as I read it, which was in 2008 when I was preparing `The King's Speech.’ It was the best script I've ever read. I wept three times when I read it - and I'm not sentimental. I've wanted to make the movie ever since.”

“The Danish Girl” is the remarkable love story inspired by the lives of Lili Elbe (Redmayne) and Gerda Wegener (Vikander) whose marriage and work evolve as they navigate Lili’s groundbreaking journey as a transgender pioneer.

“The Danish Girl” was based on David Ebershoff's debut novel. First published in 2000, the book won the Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Fiction, among other honors. It has been translated into nearly 20 languages. Producers Gail Mutrux optioned the book in 2000 and began developing the film version, bringing on Linda Reisman in 2003. In 2005 Anne Harrison joined the project with the mandate of getting the screenplay adaptation written, for which screenwriter Lucinda Coxon was soon hired.

“When I read the book, I realized that Lili's remarkable story had been swept away by the tide of history,” narrates Coxon. “Hers was an incredibly important moment, and one I'd not heard about at all. After reading the novel, I researched the story a little further. What I was particularly struck by was that this was the story of a marriage, a love story between two artists of courage and imagination. And I suppose what appealed to me was telling a universal story through something highly particular.

“I thought of them not only as a couple who loved one another but also as a pair of artists who were always creating together,” continues Coxon. “These two were constantly seeking to liberate one another, and the question became just how much change a marriage could accommodate.”

The screenplay did go through several changes on the way to the big screen. “If you're writing an adaptation, you have to love the material to begin with but then you need to take ownership of it. I did make departures from David's book to go closer to the original history, but I think the essence of his book is absolutely present. The characters had been developed and brilliantly fleshed out by David in his book, which was a gift to me. One challenge was that this is such an intimate story between two people that opens out into something with enormous ramifications. Their lives together were insular until they weren't.

The screenwriter shared that the filmmakers were, in a sense, lucky that the film hadn't been made sooner. “Tom is an incredibly bold director, and he wanted to make a film that people would relate to,” says Coxon. “As a writer, you're always fighting for your script but with these gifted colleagues I found their instincts to be strong and true. This is the moment for our film to reach people.”

Hooper concludes, “I can't overemphasize how courageous Lili was to have the surgery at that time. This was before antibiotics, before penicillin, where the risks of infection were acute and the treatments were in their infancy and very dangerous. Lili was extraordinarily brave in facing these risks.”




“The Danish Girl” is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


"Like" The Gay Life of VinVin on Facebook | Follow @GayLifeofVinVin on Twitter | Follow my blog with Bloglovin




The Danish Guy (at Lizzy Latte)

Among the many reasons why I visit Lizzy Latte....


LOLZ!!! Teehee!

I dunno if I can mention his name since I'm not sure if he's a model (which makes him a public figure) or something. But, let's just call him "Jake The Danish Guy." As the term suggests, he's from Denmark and he loves Lizzy Latte as much as I do. He's actually very tall. I'm not sure how tall he is but I'm guessing he is above 6 feet.

And I love him, too. CHOZ!

He loves Lizzy Latte's green tea smores, which I'm yet to try by the way. That smile....
And he also loves Lizzy Latte's premium ice blended latte drinks. Those brows....
And, obviously, the other Lizzy Latte patrons love and adore him, too.
But, I guess, well, he already loves and adores someone else. *sigh* CHOZ!

Click here for more of my Lizzy Latte experiences.

Lizzy Latte is located at Builder's Center Building, Salcedo Street, Legaspi Village, 1229 Makati, Philippines.


Ermmmmmmm....

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


"Like" The Gay Life of VinVin on Facebook | Follow @GayLifeofVinVin on Twitter | Follow my blog with Bloglovin




Monday, February 1, 2016

“THE DANISH GIRL” opens soon exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas


“THE DANISH GIRL” OPENS SOON EXCLUSIVELY AT AYALA MALLS CINEMAS

From the Oscar-winning director of “The King’s Speech” comes Universal Pictures' controversial and provocative drama “The Danish Girl” starring Academy Award-honorees Eddie Redmayne (“The Theory of Everything”) and Alicia Vikander (“The Man from U.N.C.L.E.”).

The film will be shown exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas starting February 03, 2016.

Based on the book by David Ebershoff, “The Danish Girl” tells the extraordinary story of Lili Elbe, one of the world's first people to undergo gender confirmation surgery, and the powerful love story of two people who go through Lili's journey together. It movingly portrays a marriage going through a profound transformation.

Scripted by Lucinda Coxon film also stars Ben Whishaw, Sebastian Koch, Amber Heard, and Matthias Schoenaerts.

In 1926 in Copenhagen, artist Einar Wegener (Redmayne) is married to Gerda Wegener (Vikander) and is revered for landscape paintings. Gerda is also an artist, less renowned but steadily working as a portraitist of prominent citizens. Theirs is a strong and loving marriage, yet personal and professional epiphanies have eluded them both.

That all begins to change one day when, on deadline for a portrait, Gerda asks her husband to fill in for a model by putting on a dress so that she can finish the painting. The experience is transformative, as Einar soon realizes that being Lili is an expression of her truest self, and she begins living her life as a woman. Gerda unexpectedly finds that she has a new muse, and renewed creative ferment. But the couple soon brush up against society's disapproval.

They leave their homeland for the more open-minded world of Paris. There, it is Gerda's career that continues to flourish. The couple's marriage evolves - and not without strain. But again and again Gerda supports Lili during her journey as a transgender woman. Through the other, each of them finds the courage to be who they are at heart.

“The Danish Girl” is vying for four Academy Awards, namely Best Actor (Redmayne), Best Supporting Actress (Vikander), Best Production Design and Best Costume Design.

At the recently-concluded Golden Globe Awards, the film was nominated for Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Original Score.



“The Danish Girl” is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


"Like" The Gay Life of VinVin on Facebook | Follow @GayLifeofVinVin on Twitter | Follow my blog with Bloglovin




The hilarious original musical parody of "Fifty Shades of Grey" is coming to Manila!


With sold out audiences in New York and a hit run in Las Vegas, the original parody 50 SHADES! THE MUSICAL is coming to Manila from February 12 – 28, 2016 at Carlos P. Romulo Auditorium in RCBC Plaza, Makati City.

Fifty Shades of Grey has topped best-seller lists around the world with over 125 million copies sold worldwide and a 2015 blockbuster movie. A sexy, hilarious romp, 50 SHADES! The Musical Parody is a laugh out loud night of fun that audiences won’t want to miss!

The musical opens with a ladies book club deciding to read Fifty Shades of Grey. Through their interpretation of the novel, the audience is led on a hilarious roller coaster ride of this unlikely bestseller. The show is full of dance numbers, 11 original songs and a live band backing the performance. Original songs include “How Much Can I Take?”, “I Don’t Make Love”, and “There’s a Hole Inside of Me”.

Like the book series, 50 SHADES! The Musical Parody is surely not for those under the age of 18, but does not cross boundaries that would make general audiences squirm. The show has audiences rolling on the floor, dancing in the aisles and begging for more. Now it’s Manila’s turn to experience this smash hit show that has toured all over US and Canada and has been produced in several other countries including UK, Australia and China.

Promoted in the Philippines by Vivre Fort Entertainment and 9 Works Theatrical, 50 SHADES! The Musical Parody will rock your world—and it’s even more fun in a group! Take your friends, take your co-workers and, as Time Out Los Angeles says, “TAKE YOUR INNER GODDESS TO THIS SMASH HIT!”




Tickets are on sale at SM Tickets, Ticketworld and Ticketnet outlets. Only limited tickets are available so better act fast. For more information about the show, visit www.50shadesmanila.com or call (02) 470 6956.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


"Like" The Gay Life of VinVin on Facebook | Follow @GayLifeofVinVin on Twitter | Follow my blog with Bloglovin




Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Fashion and music throwback in winning movie “BROOKLYN”


FASHION AND MUSIC THROWBACK IN WINNING MOVIE “BROOKLYN”

Brought to life with the dreamlike shadings of a love poem, “Brooklyn” unfolds in two distinctly atmospheric worlds: one amid the cloistered, muted beauty of Enniscorthy, Ireland and the other in the bustling chaos of New York’s Brooklyn, the frequent first stop of many immigrants to America, starring Saoirse Ronan, Emory Cohen and Domhnall Gleeson who make up the film’s love triangle.

The entirety of “Brooklyn” builds to the life-altering decisions Eilis (Ronan) must make: between Tony (Cohen) and Jim (Gleeson), between Brooklyn and Ireland, between her past and what she wants for her future. Everyone involved knew from the start that the story hinged on the uncertainty of her ultimate choice.

Helping to recreate the era in the minds of actors were the beautiful clothes sourced and created by Odile Dicks-Mireaux to evoke the inimitable elegance and grace of 1950s New York. She was thrilled to step back into that era. “It was a complete pleasure to work with these characters,” says Dicks-Mireaux, “and there was so much craftsmanship and invention in the 1950s period.”

The early era of street photography, especially work by the mysterious Vivian Maier and iconic New York shooter Elliott Erwitt, inspired Dicks-Mireaux with their candid shots of transient city moments. However, she avoided even glancing at the couture of the era.

“John’s specific edict was to not look at any fashion magazines because this is a story of real people – of working class girls trying to make their living in New York,” she explains. “In every aspect of the film, John wanted the look to be very natural and real.”

Dicks-Mireaux especially enjoyed contrasting fashionable Brooklyn, of which Eilis is soon a part, with the more austere dress of Enniscorthy. “There was a huge difference between America and Ireland in those post-war years,” she explains. “The styles could not have been more distinct which is perfect for the story we’re telling. In America it was a time of rich color – reds, caramels and yellow ochres, pinks and pale colors – that just did not exist then in Ireland.”

An equal contributor to the film’s transporting atmosphere is the music, led by an aching score from Michael Brook (Into The Wild, The Fighter). There is also a transcendent musical moment -- when Eilis volunteers to serve Christmas lunch to downtrodden Irish immigrants, only to be enraptured by one homesick man’s stirring Irish lament.
Colm Tóibín told Finola Dwyer and Amanda Posey that the unique voice of Irish singer Iarla Ó Lionáird had been a particular inspiration to him while writing that scene. Inspired themselves, they approached Ó Lionáird and were delighted to be able to bring him to Montreal to perform “Casadh an Tsúgáin” live on the set.

Ó Lionáird fully understood why it would impact Eilis so deeply. “It’s a love song, in which the repeating chorus talks about a man asking the woman to define in what way she’s connected to him,” he explains. “That resonates for Eilis, in that she’s connected to two worlds. In the song, the man is asking the woman ‘if you’re with me, you’re with me’ and he says ‘be with me in front of everybody, show everybody, be clear.’ She has to step into her own future and to decide what that is.”

Ronan was as moved as Eilis is during the scene. “Through this incredible voice, Iarla was able to communicate every emotion that you go through when you’re away from home,” she says.











“Brooklyn” opens today, January 27 exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas (Trinoma, Alabang Town Center, Greenbelt3, Market!Market!, Fairview Terraces) from 20th Century Fox distributed by Warner Bros.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


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Winning “BROOKLYN” movie tackles life abroad - now showing exclusive at Ayala Malls Cinemas


WINNING “BROOKLYN” MOVIE TACKLES LIFE ABROAD - NOW SHOWING EXCLUSIVE AT AYALA MALLS CINEMAS

Ayala Malls Cinemas brings “Brooklyn” - a very poignant story of a young woman who dreams of a better life abroad, leaves her mother and sister to a foreign land very different from the culture she grew up in and eventually finds herself torn between two men from her hometown and new town.

Saoirse Ronan has been reaping awards left and right for her role in “Brooklyn.” Born in New York to Irish parents and raised outside Dublin, Ronan first found acclaim in Joe Wright’s “Atonement,” garnering a Best Supporting Actress Oscar® nomination for her performance as Briony. She went on to starring roles in “The Lovely Bones,” “Hanna” and most recently Wes Anderson’s Oscar winning “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” all by age 20. Now entering her prime, she was ready to take on a complicated, emotionally demanding lead.

“Brooklyn” has opened in Ireland to become the highest-opening Irish film since “Michael Collins” in 1996 that starred Liam Neeson tells of a beautiful and resilient Irish young woman Eilis and her journey between two countries, two men and two destinies.

In “Brooklyn Eilis has lived her whole life in tiny Enniscorthy, Ireland – where everyone knows everyone else’s business and then some -- when she is swept away to America, thanks to her sister, who wants to see her flourish. She arrives into the diverse tumult of Brooklyn already homesick, feeling like an exile. But as Eilis dexterously learns to adapt to life as a New Yorker, becomes a sales lady at a posh department store, she meets a funny, sweet, charismatic suitor determined to win her devotion. Just as she seems on the verge of beginning a new life, a family tragedy brings her back to Ireland where she is pulled back into the life she left behind … and a decision that could affect her future forever.

Caught between two different calls to her heart, Eilis confronts one of the most breathtakingly difficult dilemmas of our fluid modern world: figuring out how to merge where you have come from with where you dream of going. Ronan says she felt an immediate, almost uncanny, affinity for Eilis as soon as she read the script. “Nick Hornby isn’t from Ireland, yet he managed to completely capture the spirit of the country. The writing was so beautiful, and so beautifully subtle,” she comments. “It felt close to my heart because it was about my people. It was the journey that my parents went on back in the ‘80s; they moved to New York and went through all these same things, even though it was a different era. The biggest hurdle anyone goes through in life is leaving the security of your family and your friends behind for something new.”

The mix of emotions that Eilis confronts – from confusion and grief to joy and devotion – was also an exciting challenge as Ronan calibrated the balance between them. “We would go from beautiful, heartbreaking, completely sad scenes to gorgeous, fun scenes to do,” Ronan notes. “Eilis is going through all these very natural things that human beings go through: grief, relationships, jobs, your relationship with your parents, independence. But I loved the subtleties of it. The challenge is that you can read so much into Eilis’s experiences and she could be played in a number of different ways. And it was also about balancing the drama of real life circumstances with the humor that people use to handle that drama, which is something that I know Irish people use an awful lot. We use humor as a way to deal with life and death. So it was about balancing all of that.”

The heart of “Brooklyn” for Ronan lies in the re-defining of home. “I love the piece of advice Eilis passes onto the young girl near the end of the film -- that when you move away, you’ll feel so homesick you’ll want to die and there’s nothing you can do about it, apart from endure it, but it won’t kill you and one day the sun will come out and you’ll realize that this is where your life is. That gorgeous piece of writing means so much to any person who has ever left their home and family. Eilis needs to go through this incredibly happy, heartbreaking, exciting, scary journey in order to make this choice about where she feels she wants to be. And for me that’s what “Brooklyn” is about. Your relationship with home is something you carry with you as move to different places in your life and endure different things. The trick is carrying it without letting it weigh you down.”




“Brooklyn” now showing exclusively at select Ayala Malls Cinemas – Glorietta 4, Trinoma, Market!Market! and Fairview Terraces from 20th Century Fox thru Warner Bros.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


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Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Irish actor Domhnall Gleeson stars in two strong Oscar contenders - “THE REVENANT" and “BROOKLYN”


IRISH ACTOR DOMHNALL GLEESON STARS IN TWO STRONG OSCAR CONTENDERS – “THE REVENANT" AND “BROOKLYN”

Rapidly rising Irish actor Domhnall Gleeson stars in “The Revenant” and “Brooklyn” – two of this year’s strong Oscar contenders. Gleeson , who has been coming to the fore as one of the most versatile actors of a new generation with roles in “About Time,” “Calvary,” “Unbroken,” “Ex Machina” and in “Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens” goes from unshaven in his role as Captain Henry in “The Revenant” to all-dapper in “Brooklyn.”

In “The Revenant” by Oscar winner filmmaker Alejandro G. Iñárritu and Leonardo DiCaprio takes on the title role, plays the role of Captain Andrew Henry, a real-life historical figure who was one of the founders of the Rocky Mountain Trading Company and a leader of the expedition up the Missouri River.

Inspired by true events, “The Revenant” is an epic story of survival and transformation on the American frontier. While on an expedition into the uncharted wilderness, legendary explorer Hugh Glass (Leonardo DiCaprio) is brutally mauled by a bear, then abandoned by members of his own hunting team. Alone and near death, Glass refuses to succumb. Driven by sheer will and his love for his Native American wife and son, he undertakes a 200-mile odyssey along with Henry’s (Gleeson) soldiers through the vast and untamed West on the trail of the man who betrayed him: John Fitzgerald (Tom Hardy). What begins as a relentless quest for revenge becomes a heroic saga against all odds towards home and redemption.

For Domhnall Gleeson, playing the role of Fitzgerald’s disappointed Captain, it was thrilling to go up against Hardy as Captain Henry realizes he has been duped. “Tom has brought an edge to Fitzgerald where you never know which way he’s going to go,” Gleeson says. “My character feels beaten down by Fitzgerald, but then he starts to hold his ground – and it was really exciting to go toe-to-toe with Tom.”

Gleeson notes that the script gives Captain Henry a fictionalized arc beyond what history knows of him. “The real Andrew Henry was respected, whereas in this story you see him as an uncertain man learning to be leader. He goes on a journey, growing into the man he was said to be,” he explains. From the start, Gleeson understood the film was going to be a purposefully challenging experience. “Before we even started shooting, Alejandro said he wanted it to be a tough experience for the actors – and he was true to his word. We were put in unusual circumstances and challenging conditions but it was exciting because it was so different,” he comments. “I certainly have never done anything like it before. There’s an exhilaration to making a movie in a way that people just don’t make movies anymore.”

Gleeson says the roughness of the shoot enriched the performances. “My character is meant to find his circumstances horribly difficult, he’s meant to feel out of place and so I poured everything I was experiencing into the performance,” he explains. “You hope that ultimately the size of all that these men contended with --- the desperation, the madness and uncertainty -- will feel present in the movie theater.”




From the cold and ruthless forest in “The Revenant,” Gleeson dons neatly pressed suits as Jim Farrell in “Brooklyn” where he plays opposite Saoirse Ronan who plays Eilis, an Irish immigrant in America who must choose between two countries, two men and two destinies.

Eilis’ Irish lover, Jim Farrell (Gleeson), had to be both an opposite attraction and a legitimate threat to Eilis’ New York lover, Tony Fiorello (Emory Cohen). Gleeson knew he, too, had to find a subtle but visceral chemistry with Saoirse Ronan, to put the question mark in the audience’s mind. “Life in Brooklyn may offer Eilis more, but it was my job to make Jim seem worth staying in Ireland for,“ he says. “I really wanted to create a connection with Saoirse that you would feel is worth fighting for.”

Like his castmates, Gleeson related to Eilis’ experience in his own way. “I think everybody’s known a sense of displacement at one time or another, of not having a clear home,” he says. “I’ve certainly been familiar with that at various times in my life -- and I thought it was captured brilliantly in this story. Then there’s a lot of romance and fun to the story, which is very appealing.”

“Brooklyn” director John Crowley says that Gleeson’s take on the character brought out the bittersweetness of the story. “There’s a consummate intelligence to Domhnall,” says Crowley. “He thinks very deeply about all his roles and he brings an intensity and maturity to Jim that bounces beautifully off of Emory as Tony. It was so important that Jim and Tony occupy vastly different spaces, that they be totally opposite versions of men that Eilis could see herself with – and Emory and Domhnall brought completely different but equally compelling feelings that underline her choice.”






“Brookyln” opens exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas starting January 27 while “The Revenant” opens February 3 in theatres (also in IMAX screens) nationwide – both from 20th Century Fox to be distributed by Warner Bros.

 Mwah! 


X.O.X.O.
VinVin


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Who is that "gay" I see staring straight back at me...?

Why is my reflection someone I don't know?

Must I pretend that I'm someone else for all time?

When will my reflection show...who I am inside?